December 2009

Rugged mountains buried beneath the ice of Antarctica have been imaged with the help of Sander Geophysics' AIRGrav airborne gravity system.  During December 2008 and January 2009 over 50,000 km of airborne gravity data were collected by one of SGL's AIRGrav systems mounted in a Twin Otter aircraft as part of Antarctica's Gamburtsev Province Project (AGAP).  Dr Michael Studinger from the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory (LDEO) of Columbia University, New York, presented preliminary results from the AGAP survey at the 2009 American Geophysical Union (AGU) meeting in San Francisco.

December 2009

The 2009 ICE Bridge project over Antarctica has wrapped up successfully.  Designed to provide vital information about ice at the poles, ICE Bridge is a NASA project to bridge the gap between the retirement of ICESat I (2009) and the launch of ICESat II (expected in 2014-15).  The project used a specially modified NASA DC-8 mounted with various pieces of equipment from multiple agencies, including Sander Geophysics' AIRGrav system.  This season, 21 missions were flown over Antarctica from a base in southern Chile, totalling 155,000 km and 227 flight hours.  This exceeded the original plan of a 17 flight mission, with some of those additional flights designed specifically to take advantage of the high resolution and accuracy of Sander Geophysics' AIRGrav system.  Highlights include the acquisition of detailed gravity maps covering the floating ice shelves associated with major West Antarctic outlet glaciers, which is expected to contribute to a better understanding of ice sheet mass balance and its relation to the changes in the polar climate.

  • Please see the following page for links to additional information on this project.

November 2009

To demonstrate the capability of AIRGrav for marine gravity applications Sander Geophysics performed a marine gravity survey on Lake Ontario in October, 2009.  Preliminary results from the survey are excellent, and the data will be publicly released once final processing has been completed.  Sander Geophysics has been acquiring and processing high resolution airborne gravity data for over 10 years using the company´s 12 AIRGrav systems.  AIRGrav is now the industry standard for high resolution airborne gravity, with over 2 million lkm of airborne gravity surveys flown worldwide.  Designed specifically for the unique characteristics of the airborne environment, AIRGrav is the highest resolution gravimeter available.  The data quality is not affected by the air turbulence normally encountered on airborne surveys, even in hot and windy environments.  The stability of the AIRGrav system also allows surveys to be flown under normal daytime survey conditions.  Until now AIRGrav has been used exclusively for airborne surveys, but AIRGrav´s ability to operate in the harsh airborne environment makes it ideally suited to marine use, where it can be used in conjunction with seismic or as a standalone survey - AIRGrav is essentially over-engineered for the less harsh environment of marine surveys, where vibration and vessel acceleration is much lower than in an aircraft.

October 2009

Sander Geophysics is proud to be participating in NASA's ICE Bridge project in Antarctica.  Having previously supplied an AIRGrav airborne gravimeter for last year's highly successful AGAP survey in Antarctica, SGL was the obvious choice to supply a reliable, high resolution, gravity system in support of NASA's current project.  The ICE Bridge project is designed to provide vital information about the ice sheet at the poles, and will bridge the gap between the retirement of ICESat I (expected in 2009) and the launch of ICESat II (expected in 2014-15).  During this period, NASA plans to acquire data using a DC-8 aircraft mounted with various pieces of equipment from multiple agencies, including Sander Geophysics' AIRGrav system, which is being provided through an agreement with Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University.  Missions will be flown over Antarctica from a base in southern Chile starting in October, 2009.

  • Please see the following page for links to additional information on this project.

August 2009

Sander Geophysics will fly a new airborne geophysical survey project under contract to Geoscience BC.  The survey, called QUEST-South, is designed to encourage exploration and create much needed jobs in BC's southern interior.  While the region has significant potential for copper-gold and copper-molybdenum deposits, parts of the area are obscured by young volcanic rock making exploration more challenging.  Sander Geophysics will use its unique AIRGrav airborne gravity technology to gather information about the subsurface.  The survey area is the size of England, so a vast area is being covered.

August 2009

Sander Geophysics is pleased to have been selected by Geoscience BC to fly a new airborne gravity survey in British Columbia, Canada.  This survey, called QUEST-South, will be Sander Geophysics third airborne gravity survey funded by Geoscience BC in this region.  Sander Geophysics will use its unique AIRGrav airborne gravity technology to fly an area of approximately 45,000 square kilometers between Williams Lake and the US border.  The new public information gathered for the mineral exploration industry is intended to encourage exploration investment and job opportunities in BC's southern interior.  The datasets from the previously flown Geoscience BC surveys called QUEST (2007) and QUEST-West (2008) are already publicly available, and they will be combined with the new QUEST-South dataset which is expected to be released in early 2010.

July 2009

Sander Geophysics' AIRGrav system was chosen for Antarctica's Gamburtsev Province Project over competing airborne gravimeters due to AIRGrav's superior performance.  Before being chosen for the demanding Antarctic survey test flights were flown over the Rocky Mountains, west of Calgary, and from Ellesmere Island in Nunavut to demonstrate the system's capabilities at high latitudes over the North Pole, and over Greenland's ice sheet.  The system then headed for Antarctica.  The AIRGrav system accurately gathers gravity data while compensating for aircraft motion due to turbulence, and aircraft vibrations, allowing for the removal of these effects from the final data during processing, using very accurate GPS.

April 2009

The AIRGrav survey flown by SGL in the Nechako Basin was part of a project funded by the Government of Canada, through Natural Resources Canada’s Mountain Pine Beetle Program.  This stimulation to mineral and energy exploration could help diversify the economy in areas recovering from mountain pine beetle infestation.  Potential oil and gas deposits can be detected by identifying the varied densities of rock revealed by the airborne gravity survey.

March 2009

Sander Geophysics (SGL) successfully completed its participation in the data acquisition phase of Antarctica's Gamburtsev Province Project (AGAP) which is part of the International Polar Year. During December and January, over 50,000 km of airborne gravity data were collected by the AIRGrav system mounted in the survey Twin Otter aircraft.  The gravity map revealed the peaks and valleys of the Gamburtsev mountains hidden beneath the featureless surface of the ice sheet.  Data is currently in Ottawa being analyzed.

Antarctica's hidden mountains - Mapping the bottom of the world

CBC Interview - Stefan Elieff (project geophysicist) talks about harnessing gravity to probe the ice-bound Antarctic mountains

  • CBCnews.ca, March 2009

February 2009

Sander Geophysics completes successful Antarctic AIRGrav survey as part of Antarctica's Gamburtsev Province Project (AGAP).  The airborne gravity survey exposed the area's markedly rugged terrain with sharp mountain peaks and well defined valleys under ice more than four kilometres thick.

January 2009

Sander Geophysics completed an airborne geophysical survey for Australian explorer Tap Oil over onshore Brunei Darussalam.  The airborne survey is the first phase of an exploration program that also involves seismic acquisition, for Block M, an area that includes the Belait oil and gas field.  The results of SGL's airborne gravity and magnetic survey will help determine the plan for further exploration in the area.